Blog Your Arteries
Work hard. Play hard. Eat hard.

Feb
10
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Feb
10

Amazing video on how to grille and make an amazing ribeye steak… look how that sears perfectly!

Feb
10

If only YouTube had something called Scent-Tube.. jeez, I’m hungry now.

And another one..

Dec
19

White rice is the foremost staple food of the East. In East Asian countries, such as China, Korea and Japan… nothing is more significant than white rice, and in particular, short grain rice. I grew up on white rice at nearly every meal. The greatest civilizations on earth have been built upon the diet of white rice (so don’t tell me the health benefits of brown rice). White rice is the fuel of many dynasties. And with that, I’ll show you how to make the perfect batch of white rice. This will change your life.

You see, all white rice isn’t created equal. Read the rest of this entry »

Dec
18

Dim Sum, well known to many foreigners, is a staple of Hong Kong cuisine and dining culture. It’s essentially a brunch for the Cantonese bourgeoisie– full of amazing small dishes with the accompanying din of other families and friends eating along side. Dim Sum is certainly something you must try, even if you don’t have the fortune to be visiting Hong Kong– but when in town, you must try an upscale Dim Sum restaurant and compare them to the less expensive counterparts that happen to be everywhere in Hong Kong. I had the fortune of having a wonderful Dim Sum brunch at the L’Hotel in the new Nina Tower (in Tsuen Wan, New Territories side of Hong Kong). A little bit more on the fancy side, L’Hotel’s Dim Sum did not disappoint. Neither did the architecture.

Nina Tower at night

Here we ordered dishes from their cubed roast pork with the amazing crispy skin (a Hong Kong delicacy), their “char siu” or BBQ pork, which happened to be very juicy, tasty, with some of the best texture of “char siu” I’ve ever had. This ain’t no Sam Woo of America. This was really good stuff.

“Char Siu” or BBQ Pork

Read the rest of this entry »

Dec
17

There’s a small chain of “char chan teng”‘s, or Hong Kong-style cafes across Hong Kong called Tsui Wah, and being one of my family’s favorite hangouts, I had to give my two cents about the restaurant. Having had Tsui Wah dozens of times, this restaurant is quite the representative for Hong Kong’s culture and cuisine– it’s busy, always crowded, loud, exciting, fragrant, and the food never skips a beat. You can order anything from breakfast noodles to broiled steak with mushroom sauce to curries to Hainan chicken (one of their specialties), all for prices you could laugh at. A great dish special will hardly ever be more than $8 US; most of them are $4 or less.

On my first time at Tsui Wah, I ordered their Yang Chow Fried Rice (being such a fried rice fan), and they delivered. Good deal, great dish with great taste and texture, and it of course was cheap.

Read the rest of this entry »

Dec
17

I just came back from visiting family in Hong Kong, a food destination in and of itself! Hong Kong is a bustling city with food of all levels, all types, all prices, at all times. Talk about selection. The whole city is one big buffet, where the typical Hong Kong person would start the day off with a warm cup of milk tea (at a cafe commonly called a “char chan teng” in Chinese) and have anything from instant noodles, buttered toast with condensed milk, Chinese fried donuts, rice porridge (“juk”), or if meeting friends, “dim sum” usually at one of the many more formal restaurants.. you know, the loud, crowded ones with the large tables, lazy susans, and lots of loud women carrying dishes or pushing carts full of small warm appetizer-type dishes.

For lunch and dinner, anything goes. Read the rest of this entry »

Nov
05

My first “Next Up?” blog post of BYA asks the question, where’s the best hot wings in Seattle? Hot wings, buffalo wings, fried chicken wings– sure there are differences, but let’s attack them one at a time. Leave me a comment and suggest a spot to be considered into the Top 5 Hot Wings of Seattle!

hotwings

Oct
29

Here at BYA, I’m looking to create a thorough blog with a team of everyday food enthusiasts to create a food blog for non-foodies. I’m concerned with the best. I’m concerned with life-changing dishes. I want to know, where’s the best teriyaki chicken in L.A.? And BYA is where you’d find that kind of info. Best Pad Thai in Seattle? No sweat, one search away.

For that, I’ll need a team. My only prerequisite is that you must be a good writer, be able to eat out (sometimes at fancy restaurants), be an existing friend of mine, and be proactive in creating the business plan of this blog. If you’re interested, shoot me an email at [nelson at blogyourarteries dot com].

Oct
23

Have you ever had black cod (also known as butterfish) collar? How about yellowtail or salmon? If you did, you would remember it. Fish collar, whether it’s broiled, smoked or grilled, is some of the best eats out there. It’s fatty, tasty, soft, tender, succulent, and good to very last bite. It’s all about the texture and the taste. The best word to describe really good fish collar? Succulence.

blackcod

I’m going to be writing another article and set of the top Seattle and L.A. restaurants serving black cod (usually marinated and/or glazed in a homemade miso sauce– Matsuhisa in Beverly Hills is very high on that list), but for now, I’ll be focusing on Black Cod Collar in Seattle. My gameplan for the Top 3 restaurants in Seattle is: Maneki in the International District, Saito’s in Belltown, Nishino, and as a bonus, I Love Sushi in Bellevue for their salted Salmon collar. My mouth is watering already!